Category Archives: Maui Island Plan

Put the Implementation Back in Maui Island Plan

A letter to the County Council from a voter (not Maui Tomorrow) follows:

Recommended changes to the Council’s proposed Bill 29

A BILL FOR AN ORDINANCE ADOPTING THE MAUI ISLAND PLAN IMPLEMENTATION PROGRAM”

Each community plan district shall have its own permanent Community District Planning Advisory Committee. PLEASE INSERT:

The Council shall establish permanent Community Plan District Advisory Committees, their rules, roles and responsibilities, and the mechanism to select the members.”

PLEASE RESTORE GPAC RECOMMENDATION:

All studies and documents completed more than five years prior to an application for a land use change shall be considered “out of date,” unless the decision-making body affirms by a positive vote that the document is still timely and relevant.”

PLEASE RESTORE GPAC RECOMMENDATION:

EA and EIS documents shall be prepared by a consultant selected by and under the direction of the Planning Department; the consultant shall be paid by the developer making a proposal.”

PLEASE RESTORE GPAC RECOMMENDATION:

On page 10-4 in the next to the last paragraph, change the word “may” back to “shall”.

To ensure that no ambiguities exist regarding infrastructure funding responsibilities, the County mayshall establish an infrastructure funding strategy to ensure that infrastructure improvements are implemented prior to or concurrent with development by the responsible party depending on the nature of the infrastructure project.”

PLEASE RESTORE GPAC RECOMMENDATION:

It is important to restore the two GPAC tables (Tables 9-1 and 9-2) in the implementation program, just as they were worded in the GPAC recommendation.

PLEASE INSERT:

All future Community Plan and Zoning Entitlements shall have a fixed time limit, to discourage ‘land-banking’, to provide for more stable employment opportunities, and to ensure smooth planning. The entitlement may be considered void, unless an appeal for an extension of 2 years has been approved by the County Council.”

Mahalo for voting on, and hopefully approving, each of these recommended modifications to this important legislation.

Administration Guts Implementation Portion of Maui Island Plan

In an article for Maui Weekly, Susan Halas writes that:

The version under consideration was drafted by the county Planning Department and dated Nov. 29, 2013. In this document, virtually all of the specific details proposed in earlier incarnations approved by GPAC and the Planning Commission have disappeared.

and says that:

Final version has few numbers and fewer details.

See more at Administration Guts Implementation Portion of Maui Island Plan

County post Maui Island Plan

The Maui General Plan has 3 Components:
– The Countywide Policy Plan was adopted in March 2010.

The MAUI ISLAND PLAN has just been put up on the Maui County website.  Its “Implementation Chapter” is yet to be adopted.

–  NEXT UP:  Review of Maui Island’s six community plans: West, South, Central, Upcountry, North, and East Maui

 —————————————

   Cover Page

The Maui Island Plan which was adopted on 12/28/2012, is the result of five years of listening to the voice of Maui’s residents, hearing what is important to each and all of us – what we want and what we need, what we fear and what we dream – and then incorporating that into public policy.

o    Directed Growth Maps çThese maps have the “growth boundaries”.

o    Protected Area Diagrams

o    Appendix A. Glossary

o    Appendix B. Maui Island Plan Map Book çThese maps are detailed.

    —————————————————–

 

Maui Island Plan Overview (From the County’s Website)

The Maui Island Plan provides direction for future growth, the economy, and social and environmental decisions on the island through 2030. The Maui Island Plan establishes a vision, founded on core values that break down into goals, objectives, policies, and actions. In addition, the Plan incorporates lessons from the past. The Maui Island Plan is the second component of the decennial General Plan update.

Specific Outcomes
The MIP looks comprehensively at many factors that influence the physical, social, and economic development of the island.  The MIP establishes a Directed Growth Strategy, which identifies areas appropriate for future urbanization and revitalization.  The MIP also identifies and addresses key environmental, housing, and economic development issues relevant to Maui’s current and future generations.

The MIP will be used by the County Council, the Maui Planning Commission, County staff, and the community as a policy foundation for day-to-day decision making in the following ways:

  • Developing, implementing, and applying policies and regulations (e.g., zoning and other ordinances, including the Community Plans, that describe the kind of development that is allowed); and
  • Determining the appropriateness of discretionary development proposals.

This Plan looks forward several generations, its recommendations will transform the way we manage our lands and plan for our communities.  Key highlights of the Plan include:

  • Adoption of a Directed Growth Plan.  Growth areas are established where future growth is desired.  This will make development more predictable for everyone, including County service and infrastructure providers.  This will help reduce development costs, provide more affordable housing, and lower taxes to the public.
  • Protection of Maui’s Small Towns and Rural Character.  Outside of growth areas development will be limited to preserve our agricultural lands and open space.  This will “keep the country – country”, a refrain repeated by many citizens.
  • Affordable Housing.  Maui will have safe, decent, appropriate, and affordable housing for all residents developed in a way that contributes to strong neighborhoods and a thriving island community.
  • Protection of Watersheds and Coastal Resources.  Watershed and coastal zone management will be integrated to protect those areas of the island that contain critical marine resources, including coral reefs.
  • Economic diversification.  We will promote emerging industries such as high technology, renewable energy, niche tourism, local agriculture, health care, entertainment, and education.  The important visitor industry will still grow, but at a comparatively smaller rate so that our economy will be more diversified.
  • Integration of Land Use and Infrastructure Planning.  We will implement a framework to ensure that our infrastructure and land use planning functions are integrated, so that infrastructure can be provided more effectively and efficiently.
 

 

        Maui Island’s six Community Plan Districts.

 

Old Maui Island Plan Maps

Council’s General Plan Committee  1:30pm  Thursday, March 1 and 15 

Comparison of three proposed maps:

1.   2009 GPAC   

2.   2010 Planning Director 

3.  2012 Planning Director

 

      C – 2    CENTRAL  MAUI  MAP

B         Waihee village –  GPAC and 2010 Director recommended “Country Town”.   2012 Director recommends a RGB.   GPAC recommended an increase in the ‘country town’ area.

C         Wailuku Country Estates  –  2012 Director recommends Rural Growth Boundary. Is Rural Growth Boundary appropriate for an agricultural sub-division?

D         Greenbelt clearly defining Wailuku + Kahului –  giving each town its own identity.

(click to enlarge)

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South Central Maui Comparison of three proposed maps:

1.   2009 GPAC   

2.   2010 Planning Director 

3.   2012 Planning Director

       C – 3    SOUTH  CENTRAL  MAUI  MAP

D         Greenbelt clearly defining Wailuku + Kahului –  giving each town its own identity.

E         Greenbelt between Maui Lani and proposed Waiale, with no UGB around the entire Central Maui urbanized area.

F          GPAC intended that there be a significant greenbelt between Wailuku and Waikapu.  2010 and 2012 Director placed 200 units in that area, reducing the separation.

G         Waikapu  — GPAC and 2010 Director indicated a UGB. 2012 Director recommends a RGB.

 

H        Waikapu Mauka – 2010 and 2012 Directors added these rural area to the GPAC’s Waikapu Urban Growth Boundary.

I           Waikapu Makai – GPAC limited size of  UGB.  2010 and 2012 Directors recommended a larger UGB.

J          Waikapu Makai East — 2012 Director added even more to UGB.

Comparison of South Maui Maps

 

K         Puunene Baseyard – 2010 and 2012 Directors recommend a larger UGB than the GPAC.

Maui Island Plan not what residents want

After seven long years, our Maui County Council anticipates completing its most important legislation in over a decade. The council hopes to adopt the Maui Island Plan today.

During the last few months, the council has transformed the MIP from a growth management plan to one of growth promotion – away from the expressed wishes and needs of Maui residents and toward the desires of developers and large landowners.

The plan’s evolution began when the county funded an extensive islandwide survey of residents. Thousands responded, giving their hopes and suggestions for Maui’s future. Citizen input was then utilized by the county’s planning professionals to develop a draft plan.

The council and the mayor then appointed a 25-member General Plan Advisory Committee made up of a diverse group of countywide volunteers to review that plan.

The GPAC held numerous public hearings in every district – in the evenings or on Saturday mornings. Hundreds of residents and community associations clearly told GPAC that they wanted certain elements within the plan: adequate affordable housing for local residents; county and state infrastructure costs controlled by building compact, efficient communities; housing located near jobs; the supply of housing units matched to the demand for housing; green belts separating one community from another in order to retain separate identities; areas to be provided for growth while leaving other areas protected; livable and walkable communities; protection for agricultural lands; and special protection for areas of cultural importance and/or scenic beauty.

GPAC also heard from large landowners and subsequently modified the Planning Department’s draft plan to incorporate all input. The plan included policies, action items and growth boundaries to guide development.

The Maui Planning Commission did much the same as GPAC, gathering additional community feedback and recommending its own independent plan proposal. All recommendations then went to the County Council, which has now spent three years reviewing and modifying the Maui Island Plan.

Unfortunately, during the last few months, the council has been persuaded by large landowners and developers to considerably expand the original proposed growth boundaries even though those original boundaries efficiently provided for an adequate supply of housing. The council’s proposed plan now allows separate communities to merge into large urban areas, thereby losing each town’s unique character.

In Central Maui, the Pu’unani project is being allowed to eliminate all open space between Wailuku and Waikapu. Upcountry, the council is adding 330 acres to Haliimaile despite no indication from the landowner as to what it’ll construct. In South Maui, the council plans to add 390 acres to Makena Resort’s already fully entitled 2,700-plus units.

Perhaps most distressing is the removal of protected areas from the maps of the Maui Island Plan. Protected areas included parks, greenways, sensitive lands and greenbelts. This concept is commonly used throughout Hawaii and elsewhere, yet our council now recommends these lands be shown merely as diagrams, thereby greatly reducing the county’s ability to fully protect them. All the protected areas should be given the security they deserve by designation on maps showing where growth should and should not occur.

Some council members have stated that the plan needs more grass-roots input and that future community plan updates are where the real decisions will be made. Ironically, with the changes of the last few months these same council members now support a plan that rejects the very recommendations put forth by our communities.

So, 2012 closes with a 20-year plan heavy with unneeded urban development areas likely to result in skyrocketing public infrastructure costs shouldered by Maui taxpayers and no guarantee of the county’s commitment to green space and protected areas. One has to wonder what, if any, real decisions will be left to make when our community plans come before the community and why so much that was good in the GPAC and planning commission’s recommended plan has simply been cast aside?

* Irene Bowie is the executive director of Maui Tomorrow Foundation.

Speak up: Makena Growth Boundary Decision on Dec 7th

Message: Makena Resort – 400more acres of development?
Not Needed, Not Wanted, Not Deserved!

SHOW UP: Tell County Council what size Makena development should be in the Maui Island Plan (MIP)

  • 400-acres were added to Makena Resort Growth Boundary on July 2012 by last minute Council vote.

  • Dec 7 is last chance Council can reverse their 4 to 4 vote on Makena expansion

YOUR VOICE COUNTS! This 400 acre addition is:

·UNNEEDED: Makena Resort already has 1000 acres (2000+ units approved in the MIP Growth Boundary) that’s plenty for 20 years

·UNWANTED: No review panel or County official supported adding these 400 acres during the 5 year review process

·UNDESERVED: Makena Resort needs to keep promises made during 2008 zoning approvals (to expand beach parks, fund roads, and more) before more land is urbanized.

ACTION: Testify in person. (RSVP here)

Keep testimony short (1 minute). Council needs time to make their decision.

Or send testimony to <county.clerk@co.maui.hi.us> by December 5th

 

This event is planned to start at 9 am on Friday Dec. 7

Maui County Building, 200 High St. 8th Fl. Wailuku

Maui Island Plan: Drop Olowalu Town, Say Testifiers

NANEA KALANI at Maui News:

The majority of testimony focused on opposition to developer Frampton & Ward’s plan to build 1,500 housing units – including 750 affordable housing units – on 600 acres in Olowalu.

More than half of the 55 testifiers during a four-hour morning session spoke out against the project, which the General Plan Committee previously voted to include within the island’s urban-growth boundary.

Testifiers repeated arguments that have been heard throughout the General Plan process, urging the council to reverse its decision in favor of protecting the reef and coastline along Olowalu.

Marine biologists, ocean researchers, snorkel tour operators and boat captains said the development would cause detrimental harm to the reef through sediment and storm-water runoff during and after construction.

Sarah McLane, executive director of the Maui Nui Marine Resource Council, expressed concern that if Frampton & Ward’s plans don’t pan out, having a growth boundary around the area would allow other developments to come in. She recommended removing the boundary altogether.

“I’m personally pro affordable housing. I’m pro jobs. I’m also for putting these things in areas that can actually sustain them in the long run,” McLane said. “Olowalu is something that all of us, the entire island, are supposed to be protecting.”

Read the whole article at Maui News

Testify: Put Green Areas Back into Maui Island Plan

Subject: Take Makena 390 acres Urban back out of the plan & Put Back In the Green Areas

Message: Makena Resort – 390 more acres of development?
Not Needed, Not Wanted, Not Deserved!

Green areas, parks, preservation turned into nonbinding diagrams?
Maui Island Plan has turned into a Growth Plan not a Green Plan
Who ever heard of a plan with no green areas set aside?

SHOW UP:

Tell County Council what size Makena development should be in the Maui Island Plan.
400-acres were added to Makena Resort Growth Boundary on July 2012 by last minute Council vote.

Tell the County Council to put back in green area maps and give them force of law.

Dec 7 is last chance Council can reverse their bad decisions the Maui Island Plan

YOUR VOICE COUNTS! This 400 acre addition is:

· UNNEEDED: Makena Resort already has 1000 acres (2000+ units approved in the MIP Growth Boundary) that’s plenty for 20 years

· UNWANTED: No review panel or County official supported adding these 400 acres during the 5 year review process

· UNDESERVED: Makena Resort needs to keep promises made during 2008 zoning approvals (to expand beach parks, fund roads, and more) before more land is urbanized.

ACTION: Testify in person.

Keep testimony short (1 minute). Council needs time to make their decision.

Or send testimony to <county.clerk@co.maui.hi.us> by December 5th

This event is planned to start at 9 am on Friday Dec. 7

Maui County Building, 200 High St. 8th Fl. Wailuku

County Makes Maui Island Plan Changes

Guest Commentary.

The General Plan Committee has finished its review

of the MIP and is forwarding it’s committee report

and proposed plan to the full council.

Here are some of the most significant differences:

1.  The whole Implementation chapter plus the

Appendix with all the needed CIP projects has been

completely left out with a hope to get it passed “next year”.

So the plan has no financial component.

 

2.  Most of the maps at the end of each chapter

have been reduced in importance by renaming them

“diagrams”, and by stating that these maps have no

force of law and are merely for “informational purposes”.

This includes the transit corridors.

 

3.  All of the “Protection Areas” on the maps have

been given the lowly status of not enforceable by law. 

These include: Greenways, Green Belts, Parks,

Preservation Areas, and Sensitive Lands.

 

4.   The GPAC and the Maui Planning Commission

worked hard to construct Urban and Rural Growth

Boundaries that would provide more than enough area

to accommodate all of the needed demand for housing units,

but NOT so large that it would become very costly for

the County and State to provide the needed infrastructure.

   Unfortunately, The General Plan Committee has not bothered

to consider infrastructure costs and has greatly expanded

those growth boundaries to satisfy the requests of a number

of developers, none of whom provided any details on what

they are planning to do within these expanded boundaries.

 

The following are just some examples: 

  390 additional acres for Makena Resort’s luxury homes;

  200 acres above the Waikapu golf courses for luxury homes;

  230 acres around the Ulupalakua Ranch headquarters;

  ALL the remaining open space between Wailuku and Waikapu;

 330 acres around Haliimaile for A&B and ML&P.

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You can find the committee report and the proposed plan here:

 http://www.mauicounty.gov/Archive.aspx?AMID=201

 

HERE ARE THE DIRECT LINKS:

 

 

 

General Plan Committee Report – Maui Island Plan

This is the 19 page Gen. Plan Committee report to the full Council.

11/13/2012 – Committee Report No. 12-125 (1 of 4)

Maui Island Plan (Exhibit B – Introduction è Chapter 7

Here are the first 7 chapters w/ Policies and actions.

11/13/2012 – Committee Report No. 12-125 (2 of 4)

 

 

 

Maui Island Plan(Exhibit B -Chapters 8, 9 + Appendix A

  Chapter 8 has the Directed Growth Maps.

11/13/2012 – Committee Report No. 12-125 (3 of 4) )

 

Maui Island Plan (Exhibit B – Appendix B):

    Here are very detailed maps of the island.

11/13/2012 – Committee Report No. 12-125 (4 of 4)

 

There will be a PUBLIC HEARING on the Maui Island   Plan held by the full Maui County Council,

probably at 9am on Tuesday, November 27

(the Tuesday after Thanksgiving).